COVID-19 Kentucky Equine Business Impact Survey is Currently Underway

The survey is a collaboration between KEEP and the University of Louisville Equine Industry Program

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Monday, May 4, 2020) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP) and the University of Louisville (UofL) Equine Industry Program jointly announced the release of the COVID-19 Kentucky Equine Business Impact Survey. The survey will be shared with employers throughout Kentucky’s horse industry and community to capture the effects of the pandemic on the Commonwealth’s signature industry.

This initiative will leverage KEEP’s relationships and trust throughout all levels and disciplines of Kentucky’s horse industry and the UofL Equine Industry Program’s expertise in the economics of the industry. The results of the survey will be shared with lawmakers at both the state and federal level to assist them in making policies that meet the needs of the industry.

Survey participants will not be identified in the published results.

Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s Executive Vice President who oversees the daily operations of the organization, commented, “Kentucky’s horse industry has 35,000 individual operations. These businesses provide nearly 80,000 jobs in Kentucky and have a $3.4 billion economic impact on the state – and that does not include tourism generated by the industry. It is critically important that employers across the industry participate in the COVID-19 Kentucky Equine Business Impact Survey to provide an accurate depiction of the effects of the pandemic on the industry and how the governmental responses so far have helped or have failed to help these businesses.”

“We are proud to be partnering with KEEP in developing this important survey,” said Sean Beirne, Director of the Equine Industry Program. “COVID-19 is impacting every facet of the equine industry in the Commonwealth and our hope is to dissect this data to provide a thorough economic overview to governmental decision makers.”

The COVID-19 Kentucky Equine Business Impact Survey can be found here.

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $177 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $40 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

ABOUT THE EQUINE INDUSTRY PROGRAM, UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
The Equine Industry Program is on the move and a leader in horse commerce, enterprise and academics. It was established in 1986 and is supported by KRS (Kentucky Revised Statute) 230.550. As one of only two AACSB-accredited equine programs in the world, the Equine Industry Program provides training and educational opportunities in the horse racing industry relating to, but not limited to, finance, management, marketing, regulation, and administrative aspects of the horse racing industry.

COVID-19 Kentucky Equine Business Impact Survey

KEEP and the University of Louisville Equine Industry Program have collaborated to survey Kentucky’s horse industry and community on the effects of COVID-19 in order to inform policy makers and industry stakeholders of the impacts of the pandemic on Kentucky’s signature industry. We need your help to understand the unique challenges the pandemic has created for the horse industry and community.

Kentucky’s horse industry consists of 35,000 individual operations. These businesses provide nearly 80,000 jobs and have a $3.4 billion economic impact on the state. It is critically important that employers across the industry participate in the survey in order to provide an accurate depiction of the effects of COVID-19 and the governmental responses to the pandemic.

The data and narrative gathered from the survey will be shared with lawmakers in Frankfort and Washington to help develop policies and assistance that meet the needs of our industry and community. We encourage you to not hold back and to be open about the impact that the pandemic has had on your business so that we have an accurate depiction of the current state of the industry. The published results of the survey will not identify the survey participants.

 

To complete the survey, click here

Additional Guidance from State Veterinarian for Boarding Facilities

In addition to the other guidelines from the State Veterinarian’s office, they also advise all boarding facilities (and any other operation that caters to outside clients of any kind) to cease all unnecessary operations and activities and close their facilities to all but essential staff. If a facility has clients that engage in self-care for their horses these individuals are allowed to come to the facility for horse care activities ONLY. Moving forward, the facility should have clients communicate with each other and staff to develop a schedule in which there is a minimal number of individuals at the facility at any given time. If a client has a horse on full or partial care (who’s needs are being met), those individuals are asked to not visit the facility. In addition, if it is possible to decrease the amount of staff in order to minimize the number of individuals coming and going from a facility, an employer is asked to do so.

Annual KEEP Day in Frankfort to be Held March 12

Industry leaders, equine affiliate organizations and horse enthusiasts to meet with legislators

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Tuesday, February 25, 2020) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP) announced that it will host the fourth annual KEEP Day in Frankfort on Thursday, March 12, 2020. KEEP Day in Frankfort provides KEEP grassroots members, industry leaders and breed associations an opportunity to share with state legislators the importance of horses to their districts and to the state’s economy.

The event will take place from 8:30 AM – 10:30 AM in Room 125 in the Capitol Annex.

Kentucky’s horse industry and community create an annual economic impact on the state of $3.4 billion. This economy supports nearly 80,000 jobs and spans the entire state. From trail rides to tourism to horse shows to the Kentucky Derby, the horse industry is woven throughout the culture of the Commonwealth.

Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s Executive Vice President who oversees the daily operations of the organization, commented, “KEEP Day in Frankfort is a great opportunity for legislators to connect with the horse industry to learn exactly what makes this industry so special and important to the state. Each year, KEEP Day brings representatives of all facets of the industry to Frankfort and we expect that this year will be our biggest yet. Kentucky’s horse industry continues to lead the nation and KEEP is proud to be part of that success.”

Created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect the state’s signature industry, KEEP represents and advocates on behalf of Kentucky’s entire horse industry – all breeds and equine pursuits.

Jensen continued, “The issues we look forward to discussing this year include the importance of legalizing sports wagering, bills that would allow veterinarians to report animal abuse and legislation that would secure enrollment spaces in veterinary programs for Kentucky’s students. Additionally, we continue working to find solutions to address the problems that plague our industry, like labor shortages. I look forward to updating legislators on the results of our partnership with the Chamber of Commerce and the innovative ideas that we are putting into practice.”

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $177 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $40 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

KEEP Applauds Chairman Koenig and the House Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee for Advancing Sports Wagering Legislation

KEEP Applauds Chairman Koenig and the House Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee for Advancing Sports Wagering Legislation

Lexington, Ky. (Thursday, January 16, 2020) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP) applauds Chairman Adam Koenig and the House Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee for advancing House Bill 137 to the House floor with an unanimous vote.

KEEP is thankful for Chairman Koenig’s longtime leadership on this issue and for Representative Al Gentry’s work on this bipartisan bill. KEEP also appreciates Governor Beshear’s vocal support for this legislation in his State of the Commonwealth address earlier this week.

Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s Executive Vice President who oversees the daily operations of the organization, commented, “We all understand that this will not solve the Commonwealth’s budget challenges. However, this legislation ensures that Kentucky will be competitive with our neighboring states, while protecting our signature industry. HB 137 will give us an opportunity to attract sports fans to our state’s racetracks and allow them to place sports wagers in a safe and trusted environment.”

KEEP encourages legislators to support this popular, bipartisan legislation when it is considered on the House floor.

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $141 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $32 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

KEEP and The Race For Education Announce  2019 Scholarship Recipients

KEEP and The Race For Education Announce 2019 Scholarship Recipients

Lexington, Ky. (Wednesday, July 24, 2019) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP) and The Race For Education are proud to announce their 2019 scholarship recipients.

The KEEP Foundation Board of Directors approved nearly $60,000 in scholarships to 21 students, attending 10 universities across the Commonwealth. 14 of the 2019 scholarship recipients are students currently enrolled with a university or college in Kentucky in an equine and/or agriculture related major or a horse-related program.

“KEEP works in Frankfort and Washington to ensure that Kentucky’s horse industry continues thriving. However, the true future of the industry depends on the next generation of talent who will bring hard work, creativity and new ideas to the table. Having this group of quality students interested in equine careers from all across Kentucky demonstrates that the industry’s future will be in good hands. KEEP and the Race for Education are honored to work with these students”, said Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s Executive Vice President.

2019 Race For Education KEEP Foundation Scholarship
Kayla Blair – Eastern Kentucky University
Merlin Cano Hernandez – Indiana University Southeast
Celene Correa Chavez – Jefferson Community & Technical College
Cayla Cowans – Northern Kentucky University
Jennifer Dones – Midway University
Noel Martinez – University of Louisville
Cameryn Oswald – University of Kentucky

2019 4-H Leg Up Scholarship
Britney Cox – University of Kentucky
Rebekah Foutch – Gateway Community & Technical College
Madeline Howard – Asbury University
Olivia Petrey – University of Kentucky
Carley VanMeter – University of Louisville

In addition to these scholarships, the Race For Education also administers a number of sponsored scholarships. Those 2019 recipients are as follows: Judy Willard Memorial Scholarship, Alexis Scarlett (Lincoln Memorial College); Robert J. Frankel Memorial Scholarship, Andres Guerrero (University of Louisville); Xpressbet Scholarship, Alex Sausville (University of Arizona); Washington Thoroughbred Foundation Scholarship, Vaiva Palunas and Sabrina James (Washington State University); WinStar Farm Scholarship, Maggie McGoldrick (University of Kentucky), Ben Petrey (Wilmington College), Madysan Petrey (Eastern Kentucky University) and Adelinn Preston (Georgia Institute of Technology).

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $141 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $32 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit http://www.horseswork.com.

ABOUT THE RACE FOR EDUCATION
Through academic development programs, tutoring, internships, financial literacy training and scholarships; The Race For Education provides opportunities for educational success for young people with significant financial need and academic challenges.
The ultimate goal of The Race For Education is to ensure our young people become successful in life and assets to their community.

KEEP Announces New Members of Board of Directors

KEEP Announces New Members of Board of Directors

Lexington, Ky. (Friday, May 10, 2019) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP), Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, announced changes and additions to the KEEP Board of Directors, following a meeting of the board on May 9, 2019.

Five new individuals were added to the KEEP Board of Directors: Sean Beirne, Debra Hamelback, Carl McEntee, Ted Nicholson and Dr. Andy Roberts. Beirne is the Director of the University of Louisville Equine Industry Program. Hamelback is the Executive Director of the Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association. McEntee is President of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club and Managing Partner of Ballysax Bloodstock.  Nicholson is the Senior Vice President and General Manager of Kentucky Downs. Dr. Roberts is a veterinarian and a member of the North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians Board of Directors.

Doug Cauthen, partner of Doug Cauthen Thoroughbred Management, LLC, will continue to serve as chairman of KEEP. Cauthen is joined in leadership by Ken Jackson who will continue serving as vice chairman of KEEP. Jackson is a partner of Kentuckiana Farms and Lexington Selected Sales Company.

Leaving the board, which coincides with the sale of his interest in Kentucky Downs, is Corey Johnsen who had served as the longtime chairman of KEEP’s Board of Directors.

Commenting on Johnsen’s tenure on the board of KEEP, Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s Executive Vice President who oversees the organization’s operations, said, “KEEP and the Kentucky horse industry owe a great deal of thanks to Corey for his steadfast leadership and guidance. His leadership in establishing Historical Horse Racing at Kentucky Downs led to adjunct revenue streams for racetracks and supplemented purses to the tune of $30 million since its inception. Corey has been integral to the work of KEEP and we are grateful for his dedication to the organization.”

Chairman Cauthen commented on KEEP and the organization’s new board members, saying, “KEEP has had many successes. Most economically significant is the implementation of the Kentucky Breeder’s Incentive Fund which has paid breeders over $141 million for breeding successful runners. KEEP also assisted significantly with the passage of Historical Horse Racing and has supported its implementation at the racetracks in Kentucky, which has not only helped the tracks, but, most importantly, increased purses dramatically. The trickle down economic impact for Kentucky is significant, in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Keeping and growing the horse industry for all breeds is the core of KEEP’s mission, and we need passionate and motivated board members to continue that. KEEP is focused on the future of the industry and that includes the recent position the organization has taken on the health and safety of the horse. The new board members that we have added will help us continue this success and evolve to meet the new challenges that KEEP and the horse industry will face.”

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $141 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $32 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

KEEP Statement on Horse Health and Safety

KEEP Statement on Horse Health and Safety

KEEP shares the concerns of everyone in the Thoroughbred industry over the recent unprecedented loss of horses in our sport. KEEP is committed to supporting initiatives to strengthen and improve the positive health and welfare of the Thoroughbred athlete as well as Jockeys. KEEP strongly supports the coalition of racetracks banning the use of Lasix in two year old races beginning in 2020 and all stakes races beginning in 2021. KEEP encourages all industry stakeholders: trainers, veterinarians, owners, and other racetracks, as well as all industry participants, to support this national compact. KEEP also calls on the industry to enact national guidelines for medication testing and laboratory standards, to perform extensive and strict pre-race evaluations of all participants to ensure their wellbeing, to require mandatory reporting of breakdowns and injuries and to apply all technology and proven materials to provide the safest facilities and racing surfaces available in the world today. These policy changes, combined with increased accountability, transparency and collaboration across the industry, will ensure a safer, trusted and more successful sport.

Note: While these views reflect the consensus of KEEP, they do not necessarily represent the specific views of individual KEEP members.

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $141 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $32 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

KEEP Day Brings the Horse Industry to Frankfort

KEEP Day Brings the Horse Industry to Frankfort

Lexington, Ky. (Friday, February 15, 2019) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP), Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, held its third annual KEEP Day in Frankfort on February 12, 2019. The event brought together diverse representatives of the horse industry to meet with legislators to discuss the importance of the $3.4 billion industry to the Commonwealth and its economy.

Speaker of the House David Osborne speaks with KEEP’s Elisabeth Jensen

Attending KEEP Day were executives from thoroughbred racetracks and sport horse organizations, leaders of industry organizations, administrators and students from the equine academic field, owners of small horse operations and more. These industry representatives met with legislators ranging from the newly elected to House and Senate leadership.

Topics of discussion during KEEP Day included sports wagering and the industry’s support for House Bill 175, introduced by Representative Adam Koenig, which would make it legal in Kentucky. Representatives of university equine programs from across the state discussed Senate Bill 81, introduced by Senate Majority Floor Leader Damon Thayer, which would provide funding to equine programs at public institutions. Recently introduced bills on equine cruelty were also a subject of conversation between industry stakeholders and lawmakers.

Speaker of the House David Osborne commented on KEEP Day, “Bringing together all of these different groups from the horse industry is critical to our work because it shows lawmakers that the horse industry is speaking with a unified voice on the issues that impact them most. We certainly understand the importance that horses have in this state and appreciate KEEP bringing a full representation of the industry to Frankfort.”

Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer is interviewed during KEEP Day about sports wagering legislation

Senator Ralph Alvarado, who represents Clark, Montgomery and part of Fayette Counties, echoed those comments, “I enjoyed the opportunity to interact with members of KEEP and hear their priorities and concerns. The horse industry is the pride of the Commonwealth and I will work to advance legislation in Frankfort that ensures that it continues to thrive.”

Case Clay, KEEP Board Member and Chief Commercial Officer at Three Chimneys Farm, noted the importance of the annual gathering, “KEEP Day was a great opportunity to meet with our legislators and discuss the issues currently being debated that could impact the horse industry. Legislators understand the outsized impact that the industry has on Kentucky’s economy and it is critical that we work together to grow that economic impact and the nearly 80,000 jobs it supports. We also had a chance to introduce KEEP and the industry to new legislators and it is so important that we build those relationships.”

Regarding the horse industry’s impact on the state, Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer stated, “The horse industry’s impact on the state reaches far and wide. What makes the industry special are the big events like the Kentucky Derby, Breeders’ Cup and the Land Rover Three-Day-Event. However, it doesn’t end there. Every small horse show, the sales events that take place throughout the year and the excellent year-round racing schedule that gets stronger every year contribute to the $3.4 billion economic impact on Kentucky.”

Representative Diane St. Onge discusses horse industry issues with KEEP Day attendees

Representative Diane St. Onge, who represents parts of Boone and Kenton Counties, agreed, “I am fortunate to represent the district that includes Turfway Park and I have seen firsthand the unparalleled impact that the horse industry has in this state. In support of one of Kentucky’s signature industries, Frankfort must continue working to grow and expand this important economic engine.”

Elisabeth Jensen, KEEP’s executive vice president who oversees the daily operations of the organization noted, “This year we had a wide-range of individuals that represented different aspects of the horse industry, which made for a very successful event. Being able to showcase the horse industry from thoroughbreds to sport horses to tourism to academics helps inform lawmakers on what is happening in this state every day, beyond the big, widely-known events.” Jensen continued, “We have wonderful support in Frankfort and we are so grateful to all of the lawmakers that take a serious interest in the work of our industry and the tremendous effect it has on the Kentucky’s economy.”

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $177 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $40 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

KEEP Statement on Historical Horse Racing Ruling

KEEP Statement on Historical Horse Racing Ruling

Lexington, Ky. (Wednesday, October 31, 2018) – The Kentucky Equine Education Project (KEEP), Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, issued the following statement on last week’s ruling on Historical Horse Racing (HHR):

After 8 years of litigation, on October 24th, Judge Thomas D. Wingate ruled that wagering on HHR machines developed by Exacta Systems should be considered pari-mutuel wagering, under Kentucky law.

KEEP worked closely with technology and machine developers in research of the initial games and with the Kentucky Racing Commission in introducing the machines. The case dates back to July 2010 when the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, Kentucky Department of Revenue and various racetracks sought confirmation from Franklin Circuit Court that the devices operated within state wagering laws.

Initially the court ruled in favor of the state agencies and race tracks, but the Family Foundation appealed the decision. Litigation continued in various Kentucky Courts until last week.

“The arguments raised by the respondent, the Family Foundation, are noble, moral and altruistic,” Judge Wingate wrote, “however, the arguments advanced by the Family Foundation fail as the Exacta machines are structured to operate in accordance with the pari-mutuel system of wagering. Furthermore, the Legislature has determined that historical racing machines are not gambling devices as long as they comport with pari-mutuel wagering.”

Exacta Systems machines are currently in use at Kentucky Downs, Ellis Park and Red Mile in partnership with Keeneland. Parimax and Ainsworth Game Technology machines have been approved by Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, but are not included in this ruling.

This is a big win for KEEP and for our entire industry. Since 2011 HHR has contributed over $31 million dollars the Kentucky Thoroughbred and Standardbred Development Fund. This has increased purses significantly at Kentucky Downs and in 2018 has provided for an additional $1.5 million dollars in purses at Ellis Park, Keeneland and Churchill Downs. The increase in purses at Kentucky Downs and Ellis Park have created a summer racing circuit in Kentucky with quality races that attract trainers and owners from all of the country.

The result of this successful wagering alternative has put Kentucky’s horse racing industry on a positive trajectory in nearly every measurable category, where many other competing states have plateaued or are shrinking. What this means for Kentucky is that the horse industry – which is responsible for $4 billion in economic impact and 80,000 direct and indirect jobs – remains robust and healthy.

“Obviously we are very pleased with the Court’s well-reasoned and detailed ruling,” said Kentucky Downs president and KEEP Legislative Committee Chairman Corey Johnsen. “Judge Wingate carefully considered the facts and found that Exacta Systems and our historical horse racing is pari-mutuel and complies with Kentucky law.

ABOUT KEEP
The Kentucky Equine Education Project, Kentucky’s equine economic advocate, is a not-for-profit grassroots organization created in 2004 to preserve, promote and protect Kentucky’s signature multi-breed horse industry. KEEP is committed to ensuring Kentucky remains the horse capital of the world, including educating Kentuckians and elected officials of the importance of the horse industry to the state. KEEP was the driving force in the establishment of the Kentucky Breeders Incentive Fund, which has paid out more than $141 million to Kentucky breeders since its inception in 2006, and pari-mutuel wagering on historical horse racing, which has been responsible for more than $32 million to purses and more than $24 million to the Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund.

KEEP works to strengthen the horse economy in Kentucky through our statewide network of citizen advocates. To learn more about how you can become a member or support our work, please visit www.horseswork.com.

Learn About Equine Tourism in Kentucky at Castle & Key Distillery

Learn About Equine Tourism in Kentucky at Castle & Key Distillery

Join KEEP at Kentucky’s newest distillery, Castle & Key, on October 2 for the next event in the Equine Summit Luncheon Series. The luncheon topic will be Equines and Tourism in Kentucky. Learn more about this event and register here.

The event will feature special guest speaker Regina Stivers, Deputy Secretary of Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. 

Additional speakers include representatives of Horse Country, the University of Louisville and Visit Lex.